How long do i spend on each module?

Hello Everyone.
How long should i spend on something such as switching between chords A & D in module 1 before moving on? a week? I know the answer might be “when you feel youve nailed that module” but what if i never feel that way. I don’t think you want me staying on a module for a month…lol

When you’ve learned a few songs in that module, this applies to any of the modules really.

It depends on the module but I’d say move on once you understand the content, to avoid getting stuck, and keep practicing. It doesn’t have to be perfect. You often can combine the things you learn.

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When you’re bored of what your doing it usually means you know not well enough to move on.

With that said keep playing to you’re sick of it

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As @DarrellW said makes sure you play some of the 2 chords songs, so you are applying what you have learnt and met the criteria Justin sets out in the last lesson of that module. Keep working on songs for that module, whilst learning the next module ie keep practicing what you have learnt and apply it to as many songs as possible. Keep doing that module to module but refining the songs from previous modules improve their quality. Record them and listen.

Don’t move on because you are bored, that does not equate to knowing and applying the module contents, it just equates to being bored and that could be bored of getting it wrong. Practice until you can apply it. Simples.
:sunglasses:

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I’d at least get your chord changes consistently above 30/minute. I tend to hang around with a module’s preset practice routine until I’m confident or at least fairly familiar with most, if not all, of the concepts. This can take an extended period of time for me, but I’m finding that it’s paying off in the playalong songs.

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Well, ive been playing for 2 days, I don’t think i can play any songs and if anything ill just get frustrated sitting on this one thing for 6 months until i learn enough to play an entire song or several

I see, so you’re saying that down the road, in this same lesson there are songs to learn with just these two chords and i should learn these well prior to moving on, got it.

I tend to look at the course as a layered approach - I’ve said this before - consume the lesson, make sure you understand it, watch it again, start practicing and make sure you have a practice routine. So you’ve done a lesson, it’s now in your practice routine, practice it until you are really comfortable ( might be days might be weeks) and when you are ready put that into songs. So now lesson learned, practice started and started with songs… at this point start thinking about the next lesson, perhaps watching it, getting a feel for the new chords, skills etc. you’re practice at this point is still the last lesson and songs… when you are ready and have the next lesson understood add this to your practice routine…so practicing things from lesson 1 & 2… songs probably still incorporating chords from lesson 1 only… then there will come a point when you are comfortable to add lesson 2 chords etc to your song practice… and so on.

It’s not about have a clinical beginning and end to each stage. You start a lesson integrate it into your practice and later into your songs. When you are comfortable with material you move on to the next thing.

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Jesse, lots of good advice already shared.

Justin does offer guidelines, such as number of One Minute Changes. When you can achieve that level, remembering that while the exercise emphasis is on speed you should be making reasonably clean chords, I think one is ready to move on and learn the next chord shape.

As @Rossco01 said, watch the lesson and begin practice. If learning a new chord it begins with Chord Perfect (Strum Pick Strum) and then adding the new chord it One Minute Changes.

While doing this continue to spend practice time learning songs. Use the filter on Song Lessons to find suitable songs.

You can begin that learning playing a single down strum per bar on beat 1, then maybe beats 1 and 3, to 4 down strums per bar, then adding up strums. If you don’t use the App then at a point try playing with Justin as he plays slowly through the song. Eventually you could try playing along with Justin when he plays the song at the start of the lesson.

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@DavidP and @Rossco01 are on the money, of course. Rossco’s “layering” terminology resonates with me.

Everyone is going to tell you to play songs, and they are not wrong! After all, isn’t that why we picked up the guitar in the first place? However, if you are like I was in the earliest stages, even when I played songs it did not feel or sound like what I was playing was a song. To be honest, I found that frustrating and sometimes discouraging. I can only assure you that if you push through those feelings of doubt and keep following the course and practicing regularly then it will gradually start to feel like you really are playing songs, and even more importantly, it will SOUND like you are playing songs!

The answer to how long it takes on any module is exactly what you predicted for yourself - move on when you are ready. It takes as long as it takes. I have never seen a single person say “you know, when I was starting out I think I should have moved past some of those modules faster. Taking my time really stunted my growth as a player!”

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Don’t be afraid to move on to the next module. You don’t need to feel like an A and D ninja before adding more chords. The practices for the next few modules will continue to reinforce the A and D chords.

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I think you can move on when you have mostly got it sorted, you’ll still be playing those A & D chords for as long as you hold a guitar.

But if you’re still at a point where moving on to C and G etc means you forget or cant do A & D or are not improving then go back.

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I can only tell you what ive experienced so far closing in on the end of grade 1. What I’ve been doing is assessing every week. So I’ll watch the videos and do the practice for a week. At the end of the week I’ll assess my self based on Justin’s milestones. If I haven’t gotten there yet ill add another week and assess again.

So far though I’ve hit the milestones every week so I haven’t spent more than 1 week on each. At the end of each grade there is a consolidation period where you’ll spend a lot of time refining everything from the grade before moving on. That’s where I personally am gonna take my time and learn a bunch of songs to refine

I’ve noticed that some of the grade 2 modules justin will mention spending at least 2-4 weeks on a specific module, but the stuff there is more complex than grade 1s content so that may not be relevant to grade 1.

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Yeah, the modules tend to take longer (at least for me) in Grade 2 - but I made the mistake of not learning many songs in Grade 1. Honestly I got bored with songs with just a few chords so moved on probably faster than I should have. Except some AC/DC which is just a few open chords but oh so difficult to play well :slight_smile:

That being said, the material gets more and more fun as you progress - especially the blues sections (at least for me) and I have now found that I’m spending weeks or more on lessons because I’m trying to get everything I can out of them.

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Hello @scripteaze welcome to the Community.
You have had a lot of good comment so far so I won’t repeat.
I will direct you to Nitsuj.
When Justin overhauled, reworked and improved the old ‘classic’ beginner course, he wanted to test it out for himself, on himself. He paid in blood, sweat and tears by teaching himself from scratch how to play left-handed. If you have not yet viewed any, it is definitely worth checking the Nitsuj progress videos. You can get a very good sense of what progress looks and sounds like plus good information on when to stick at a level and when to move on.

Nitsuj grade 1 practice videos

Hope that helps.
Cheers :smiley:
| Richard_close2u | JustinGuitar Official Guide & Moderator

Yes the Nitsuj videos are indeed an eye opener. Not only does he experience the same difficulties we all have, he has the expert ear and knowledge of what is “good enough” to move on. Perfectionists prepare to be shocked.

Be forgiving of yourself and everything is always revisited through the practice schedules where you can hone your skills to eventually sound great.

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