How to Play Easy Chord Shapes Up The Neck Lesson on JustinGuitar

View the full lesson at How to Play Easy Chord Shapes Up The Neck | JustinGuitar

1 Like

Man, how could you not mention “End of the line” as an example of moving D-shapes? : )
Cheers!

1 Like

Really awesome lesson! Super fun and really helped me focus back on exploring and enjoying new sounds on the guitar. Definitely worth every minute and a great pairing the the “lush chords” lesson from a while back. Thanks for this type of lesson and can’t wait for more in the future.

1 Like

Great lesson, some beautiful sounds there. Looking forward to the next one. Cheers!

1 Like

The opening riff from Fluffhead by Phish is moving the C-shape up and down the neck and G barre chord at the end. Just figured it out after this lesson! Highly recommend

1 Like

D-shapes and triads … End of the Line by The Traveling Wilburys | JustinGuitar.com

Cheers :blush:
| Richard_close2u | JustinGuitar Official Guide & Moderator

C7 can be moved up the neck too.

1 Like

Wow Justin! I am working on 3 issues simultaneously: 1) memorizing the notes all along the fretboard, 2) the Caged system, and now this wonderful lesson! I can play many songs thank to your lessons, but now I feel that I was confined to the freys 1 to 5, and now a whole universe opens its doors to me! Thank you!!!

3 Likes

I really want to learn, but having some difficulties in my mind

1 Like

Unbelievable!..I’ve just had one of those moments where something ‘clicks’ and you get a bit excited.
I’ve been working on a nice acoustic track from my younger days and the tabs online were a little out.
There’s a fast chord change at the end of the bridge {D A G F GGG}
I’ve just moved the F up 2 frets and…perfect!
BTW - it’s ‘Fine Time’ by Cast.
Sounds great through a decent acoustic and amp. Cast - Fine Time - Live on Radio City Talk - YouTube

Thank you so much for this lesson {and all others} :blush: :guitar:

1 Like

I’ve just remembered an excellent example of moving chords…
‘Clues’ by Paul Weller. The ‘Days of Speed’ live version is so good.
The chord is a Dsus2 and it starts moving around at 1m 53s {with a great walking bass}
Stunning acoustic sound! :blush::guitar: Paul Weller - Clues - Later Live - BBC2 - Friday 5th October 2001 - YouTube

1 Like

Teacher…if you can move around the C shape by adding little finger it’s probably because you always can have the 5th… Doesn’t It work the same with G? I mean if I move around the Big Rock G shape I’m adding the 5th and sounds quite allright to my ear. Does It make sense?

1 Like

Really useful, thanks Justin
I have a really really classic blues / gospel example of moving the G chord
It’s Mississpppi john Hurt doing You Got to Walk that Lonesome Valley
The sound brings this ethereal other-worldly quality to a three chord song. it’s just amazing. here he is singing and playing it in about 1964 Mississippi John Hurt - You Got To Walk That Lonesome Valley (Live) - YouTube

1 Like

This is getting better and better, thank you Justin! After the last lessons here, I definitely need to add more practice time to my routine to learn all these variations I was still unaware off, it’s lesson after lesson after lesson with things I’ve never heard of before … . After 2.5 yrs, I can say I see/hear progress and it’s all coming together, but these lessons here are a kind of booster for me. Now I just need to check to rearrange my time slots … .

1 Like

Slowly slowly I seam to be understanding music, brilliant lesson

1 Like

As you find new chords how do you know what the new chord is called. If it starts with a chord shape, move that shape seven frets what then is that new chords name.

1 Like

Hi there and welcome to Community. If you move C shape chord down to 7th fret assuming you only play fretted notes it’s Gb. Now Gb chord consists of notes:

Gb Bb Db

So you can’t play any open strings unless you tune down your guitar half a step and play the C shape on 8th fret.

I suggest doing a Practical Music Theory course by Justin this should clear some waters :slight_smile:

1 Like

Hello @jnretired and welcome to the community.

Knowing what the root note is gives you the most important information.
You can use the Note Circle to help. The Note Circle | JustinGuitar.com

Take the C major and move it up 7 frets. Look at the Note Circle. Count 7 notes clockwise from C and you land on the note G. Your chord is a type of G chord. Perhaps a G major or perhaps the open strings mean its name is not so simple. Without some theory this can become complex - and, if you’re just enjoying what it sounds like, unnecessary at that moment.
But, for sure, take the theory course if these questions naturally come to mind.

Cheers :blush:
| Richard_close2u | JustinGuitar Official Guide & Moderator

Feel free to pop in to the Community Hub and introduce yourself there. Community Hub - JustinGuitar Community

The song “Plateau” by the Meat Puppets (or Nirvana Unplugged if you wish) does use the G shape. Although I don’t feel they strum all the strings.

1 Like

Great lesson!

If you combine it with a bit of theory, it gets pretty cool as well.

For example the drone thingy with the A-Shape. The 3 major chords in the key of A are : A, D, E. Playing the D & E substitute over an A drone is kind of playing a IV & V chords, right?

Pushing it further, I suppose even the B substitue (which had the particular flavor in the video) could work in some context.

Like A → B (A drone) → E (A Drone). A, B & E are the 3 major chords of E Major. And, with a focus on the A (thanks to the drone effect), I suppose it’d give the progression… a Lydian flavor **

** With Lydian flavor, I mean : the flavor a chord progression might get if you focus strongly on the IV chord of the major scale, while making it clear that is is the IV chord; for example by occasionaly playing the V chord or iii chord.

1 Like