Major Triad Grips (Strings 1/2/3)

@Phoenix97 Yes that’s exactly what they are but it is more common to refer to them as the chord shape the are derived from.

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Thank you very much Rick, I wanted to get sure if I really understood the lesson about inversions

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@Phoenix97
Yes, those inversion titles are exactly correct.

Cheers :smiley:

| Richard_close2u | JustinGuitar Official Guide, Approved Teacher & Moderator

Thanks Justin, this singlehandedly changed my guitar playing so much and taking my songs in my head into reality. Thanks again

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Grip 1: Using fingers 1 & 3 I have no problems, but I have trouble with the mini barre when I use fingers 1 & 2.
Any practice advice to get the mini barre working with fingers 1 & 2?

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I gave some input on this question some months back:

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Thanks @jjw, I will do as you suggest and keep at it until it sounds good.

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So (just making sure) the 3 shapes are moveable shape that can be played anywhere on the neck? (as its on the 3 lower strings of course)

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Whenever you play something that doesn’t involve open strings, then it is moveable to anywhere on the neck. By “moveable”, I mean you can move the grip up or down the fretboard, keeping the same strings fretted, of course.

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Yes. 100%.
:slight_smile:

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Maybe I’m getting ahead of myself here, but would a C triad (grip 3 with the root note on the 3rd string) be a C7 triad if I streeetched my pinky to the Bflat on the 6th fret of the 1st string?

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Sure. That’ll give you a C7, (minus the 5th, which is not really necessary anway).

Even better, if you fret the G on the D string 5th fret, to give you a 2nd inversion C, then you can easily access both a C6 (CEGA), and the C7, (CEGBb) on that e string for that pumpin blues sound that is so common.
Keep exploring mate. Those cool 7th etc sounds can be found all over the place.

Cheers, Shane

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So playing a major triad grip 3 for strings 234 and adding the note on the same fret of the first string is the “6” version of that chord? (Essentially barring four strings.)

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Yep, thats it. That’ll give you a C6. And move up one fret on the high e, and you’ll get the C7. Technically, these arent triads. Justin would call them ‘quadads’ I think from memory.
Nonetheless, its a cool sounding, and useful grip, extending on from the basic triad.
So, if you move between the C, C6, C7 shapes, you get that very familiar bluesy sound.
The grip you’ve discovered is just as useful, so now you got both in your toolkit :nerd_face:.

Cheers, Shane

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Thanks for your input. I think I might be a music theory junkie.

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A great addiction to have I reckon :+1:

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This is a grwat lesson and probably worth including on the biginners course. The theiry is not that complicated and it gives you the confidence to move around the fretboard.

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Peter

It is covered in Grade 3 :sunglasses:

Oh ok. Thanks.Just about to start grade three after I finish the current music theory module

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A visual representation of G chord grips and the pattern of the root notes

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