Name That Chord

Learn how to name any chord you find on the neck in 4 easy steps!


View the full lesson at Name That Chord | JustinGuitar

Moderator note

It has been pointed out that the answer sheet is temporarily unavailable. In lieu of that, and until a fix is applied, I am posting this here.

Screenshot_142

Step 1 - Major Scale of the root note

This example has a G root, so G Major Scale: G A B C D E F#

Step 2 - Notes of the chord

From low to high, they are G, F, B, C#

:rotating_light: About the enharmonics here - I chose F rather than E# (because a b7 is common) and C# rather than Db (because #11 is common and b5 not).

Step 3 - Detective Analysis

G - the root note
F - the b7
B - the 3
C# - the #11

Step 4 - Name it

R 3 b7 #11

It is a dominant 7th chord (no 5th) with a #11 added.
G7#11

Screenshot_143

Step 1 - Major Scale of the root note

This example has a D root, so D Major Scale: D E F# G A B C#

Step 2 - Notes of the chord

From low to high, they are D, F#, C#, E

:rotating_light: About the enharmonics here - all are scale degrees so the choices were simple.

Step 3 - Detective Analysis

D - the root note
F# - the 3
C# - the 7
E - the 9

Step 4 - Name it

R 3 7 9

It is a major 9th chord (no 5th)
D maj9

Screenshot_144

Step 1 - Major Scale of the root note

This example has an E root (Neck Diagrams does not show this in red as it is an open chord), so E Major Scale: E F# G# A B C#, D#

Step 2 - Notes of the chord

From low to high, they are E, F#, G, D, E

Step 3 - Detective Analysis

E - the root note
F# - the 9
G - the b3
D - the b7
E - the root

Step 4 - Name it

R b3 b7 9

It is a minor 7th chord with a 9th added (no 5th)
E min7 add9

I hope that helps.

I hope Justin does not have different answers!

Cheers :blush:
| Richard_close2u | JustinGuitar Official Guide & Moderator

Thats just a great skill to have

1 Like

I haven’t gotten to this level of the theory course yet and don’t want to jump ahead, but may I hijack and ask a cord naming question here?

I have been looking at some classical exercises and one cord they use is this:

I am just trying to name it.

It has a B dim triad, B, D, F, but also an open G string, so would that be something like a Badd6 dim? That seems odd. Thanks!

1 Like

G7/B so a G7 chord with B base I would say sounds better.

2 Likes

Ah, I get it. I was just off track because I am in the triads of the theory course, so I looked at it as a B dim triad. Not a G with an alternative base. Makes sense. Thanks!

1 Like

I’m probably just not spotting the link but where are the answers to the test on this page? Ta.

1 Like

@Joeldunn Hello and welcome to the community.

You’re correct - I have reported this issue. Thanks for the alert.

Cheers :blush:
| Richard_close2u | JustinGuitar Official Guide & Moderator

Quite annoying to spend a lot of money on a premium course only to discover test answers are missing. Can someone please advise when this will be fixed?

1 Like

Hi @adrian2

Please see here: Name That Chord

Please see here for my answers: Name That Chord

I’m not sure that last one is correct. I see a ‘D’ not a ‘C#’, which makes that a flat 7, making the chord a Emin7add9 I think?? Not entirely positive on that.

1 Like

Thanks @aldowain - now fixed

For the first test question how come we dont call it G#11? is it because in order to skip the 7th in the name it has to be major 7th? so every dominate 7th will that 7 + its extension?

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In Justin’s third example, the C7#9, why isn’t it called a C#9, if “9, 11, or 13 implies the 7th”? Or a Cadd#9? Is it because C#9 would not be a C chord but a C# chord? Or because it’s an addition or alteration, instead of an extension?

1 Like

Hi Gregg,

The note name in the name of the chord refers to the root note, which in this case is C. :wink: Also, Cadd9 (or add#9) doesn’t have a flat 7th in it.

2 Likes

Thanks Jozsef! It makes total sense now. :slight_smile:

2 Likes

Only 1 1/2 coffees in this morning…but for test 2, given the fret numbering, should this not work out as a Dmaj9 rather than a Cmaj9 - as fret 5, 5th string (in standard tuning) is a D not a C??
Great EVERYTHING JG - even the bits to keep us on our toes! Thanks :smile:

2 Likes

Hello @XCmad and welcome to the Community.
Who needs coffee when you can spot those details! haha

Well spotted indeed.
I have edited the page which now reads correctly.
Also, see my additional notes in the first post above.

I hope that helps.

Cheers :smiley:

| Richard_close2u | JustinGuitar Official Guide, Approved Teacher & Moderator

Because the F# came ahead of all notes but first Open E on 6th string was tempted to name with an add2 but I get it. Don’t do add 2s

1 Like

In the last example on the mini quiz, the Emin9 chord, how come there is no 5th note in the chord? There was no B note played in this chord.