Name That Chord

Learn how to name any chord you find on the neck in 4 easy steps!


View the full lesson at Name That Chord | JustinGuitar

Moderator note

It has been pointed out that the answer sheet is temporarily unavailable. In lieu of that, and until a fix is applied, I am posting this here.

Screenshot_142

Step 1 - Major Scale of the root note

This example has a G root, so G Major Scale: G A B C D E F#

Step 2 - Notes of the chord

From low to high, they are G, F, B, C#

:rotating_light: About the enharmonics here - I chose F rather than E# (because a b7 is common) and C# rather than Db (because #11 is common and b5 not).

Step 3 - Detective Analysis

G - the root note
F - the b7
B - the 3
C# - the #11

Step 4 - Name it

R 3 b7 #11

It is a dominant 7th chord (no 5th) with a #11 added.
G7#11

Screenshot_143

Step 1 - Major Scale of the root note

This example has a D root, so D Major Scale: D E F# G A B C#

Step 2 - Notes of the chord

From low to high, they are D, F#, C#, E

:rotating_light: About the enharmonics here - all are scale degrees so the choices were simple.

Step 3 - Detective Analysis

D - the root note
F# - the 3
C# - the 7
E - the 9

Step 4 - Name it

R 3 7 9

It is a major 9th chord (no 5th)
D maj9

Screenshot_144

Step 1 - Major Scale of the root note

This example has an E root (Neck Diagrams does not show this in red as it is an open chord), so E Major Scale: E F# G# A B C#, D#

Step 2 - Notes of the chord

From low to high, they are E, F#, G, D, E

Step 3 - Detective Analysis

E - the root note
F# - the 9
G - the b3
D - the b7
E - the root

Step 4 - Name it

R b3 b7 9

It is a minor 7th chord with a 9th added (no 5th)
E min7 add9

I hope that helps.

I hope Justin does not have different answers!

Cheers :blush:
| Richard_close2u | JustinGuitar Official Guide & Moderator

Thats just a great skill to have

I haven’t gotten to this level of the theory course yet and don’t want to jump ahead, but may I hijack and ask a cord naming question here?

I have been looking at some classical exercises and one cord they use is this:

I am just trying to name it.

It has a B dim triad, B, D, F, but also an open G string, so would that be something like a Badd6 dim? That seems odd. Thanks!

G7/B so a G7 chord with B base I would say sounds better.

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Ah, I get it. I was just off track because I am in the triads of the theory course, so I looked at it as a B dim triad. Not a G with an alternative base. Makes sense. Thanks!

I’m probably just not spotting the link but where are the answers to the test on this page? Ta.

@Joeldunn Hello and welcome to the community.

You’re correct - I have reported this issue. Thanks for the alert.

Cheers :blush:
| Richard_close2u | JustinGuitar Official Guide & Moderator

Quite annoying to spend a lot of money on a premium course only to discover test answers are missing. Can someone please advise when this will be fixed?

Hi @adrian2

Please see here: Name That Chord

Please see here for my answers: Name That Chord

I’m not sure that last one is correct. I see a ‘D’ not a ‘C#’, which makes that a flat 7, making the chord a Emin7add9 I think?? Not entirely positive on that.

Thanks @aldowain - now fixed

For the first test question how come we dont call it G#11? is it because in order to skip the 7th in the name it has to be major 7th? so every dominate 7th will that 7 + its extension?

In Justin’s third example, the C7#9, why isn’t it called a C#9, if “9, 11, or 13 implies the 7th”? Or a Cadd#9? Is it because C#9 would not be a C chord but a C# chord? Or because it’s an addition or alteration, instead of an extension?

Hi Gregg,

The note name in the name of the chord refers to the root note, which in this case is C. :wink: Also, Cadd9 (or add#9) doesn’t have a flat 7th in it.

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Thanks Jozsef! It makes total sense now. :slight_smile:

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