Small Nits On Practice Page

Apologies couldn’t help it. Love the site and the software engineer in me has to point out the tiniest issues for some reason. It’s a habit… been trying to kick.

There are a couple of small typos at the end of the practice about page.

Stats

Our stats are basic for now but we’re working on more fun things for this area - right now it’ll rack time spent practising and also the stats for items (chord changes or metronome speeds, that kind of thing).

Don’t punt me - just joined :wink:

Welcome to the forum Chris not nit picky at all. That’s how things get fixed.
I’ll alert the wizard behind the curtain. @Richard_close2u

If you live in the UK practising is spelt correctly. :smiley:

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And “spelt” is also spelled correctly for a Brit. :grin:

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What’s the old saying? America and England: two people separated by a common language!

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America and the UK if you don’t mind. We also have a saying. Scotland and England two countries……………:smiley:

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When I’ve visited Scotland, I often struggled to understand people. One Scot told me “don’t feel bad; we don’t speak the language so much as we chew it up and spit it out!” Another told me (after an elderly gentleman spoke to me and I hadn’t understood a word he said) “even we sometimes have to have a translator for some of the older brothers!”

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I’ve never been to America but have given up, on many occasions, watching an American film/series on TV due to an inability to understand any of the dialogue. :joy:

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I had no idea. Cheers!

I was born and lived on and off in Scotland through my early years. I always blame my lose grip on the English language as English not being my first language ;-).

Thanks for the info though. Learn something every day.

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I’ve never been to America but have given up, on many occasions, watching an American film/series on TV due to an inability to understand any of the dialogue.

Husband and I have never been to England and often times he turns on the closed captioning to figure out what is being said. I don’t have as bad a problem, probably because I grew up watching reruns of Doctor Who and Monty Python on Public television!

Dr Who and Monty Python are fairly mellow accents.

Accents, and colloquialisms are something I find quite interesting, as lots of local dialects are dying out.

I grew up around lots of different accents as the parents had a caravan site, so there are very few English speaking accents I don’t understand.
Hardest ones are things like proper Doric/Aberdonian, or there are pockets in England with very strong accents (if anybody has watched Clarkson’s farm, the local helper is a good example of a very strong local accent/dialect).

I personally have quite a strong accent, so other people often struggle to understand me. I just need to remember to talk a bit slower and clearer when amongst non-locals.

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On one of my Scotland trips, a brother who was from Centre-City Edinburgh was talking to me as he was talking me to a lodge meeting. I had to say “I’m sorry, I can’t understand you and I feel really bad about it.” His response: “Och, dinnae!” :rofl:

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I keep the subtitles on permanently. It’s a habit I got into when I was married.