Practical Music Theory Workbook - Grade 1

The PMT workbook does not set this limit. How about guitars with 8 or 12 strings?

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@Boris1565 EQ ranges are different to actual pitches that can be played on a guitar by playing open strings or fretted strings.

@Cyril_fr Justin teaches 6-string and this is just Grade 1 PMT also. Other types of guitars are outside the scope of this.

I was over generous in stretching to 24 frets as that is not the norm on most guitars that most people have. I did so simply to have a span that ran from the note E on the open 6th string to another note E some octaves higher.

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@Richard_close2u thanks Richard.

@Boris1565 there was no mention of amps or peddles in the lesson and you can add any guitar peddle to any acoustic or electric piano so the article you posted has no relevance

@Cyril_fr on 12 srting guitar’s octive string is the same thickness on both of the high e strings so the Hz is the same. On a 8 string guitar if it has a high A string it would only be 5 semi tones high(A7) than the e on a 6 string so still lower frequency than a 88 key piano C8

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True, I just pointed out how the error might occur. Nothing else. :smile:

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Just for clarity, it is not just detailed in the new Workbook but also in the new lesson that has recently been added.

and associated notes (text) :wink:

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I think the confusion is due to the difference between

  1. the frequency of the highest note and
  2. the highest frequency produced.

When a note is played, you hear not only the fundamental frequency, but also overtones at higher frequencies.

@Richard_close2u 's table above gives the fundamental frequency for the various notes on guitar and piano. When speaking of the frequencies of notes played by guitar (or any instrument), it really only makes sense to speak of the fundamental frequencies, i.e. Richard’s table.

Maybe the overtones produced on a guitar can go up to 7 kHz (or whatever), but that isn’t what the “range” of the guitar is.

So, yeah, I think the material on JustinGuitar cited above should probably be edited.

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Revisited the grade-1 practical music theory and I love the new stuff.

However in page 9 of the workbook(2024), I think the diagram of the fretboard should be horizontal to make sense with the corresponding article which explains

The note gets lower on the guitar if
we move left (toward the headstock)
along a single string

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@Cyril_fr @judi @Lisa_S @stitch @Boris1565 @TheMadman_tobyjenner @jjw

Message from @larynejg … the workbook has now been revised - please check the new version. :wink:

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Piano goes both lower and higher?

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Yes, then some parts of the text need to be changed as well:

Piano goes lower, down to 27.5 Hz, but not as high, only up to 4.18 kHz (4180 Hz).

As the piano goes higher, the previous comparison with a higher value of the guitar does not make sense.
It’s in the PMT workbook and in the text below the video.

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@Richard_close2u @larynejg the video needs to be edited and the text on the web site also needs to be edited. Justin says 7000Hz in the video and in the text under the video it still says
“Guitars only play notes between 80Hz to 7kHz”
In the video at the 2:20 mark Justin says “The frequency of a guitar is roughly 80Hz to 7kHz”

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Hi @stitch

When I got my processor, I decided to see where realistic filtering should be set. Not only by ear, but also because I am familiar with what happens in digital processing, I took a look at what range the guitar can realistically make and placed filters to limit my chain accordingly in case of dodgy digital processing.

1318.5 Hz is the frequency of the little E string at the 24th fret. Since we know that strings do not produce clean sinusoids, I figured that two octaves up would be a reasonable expectation for what frequency range to let pass. This is 1318.5 * 4 = 5274 Hz. So, I set my filters to roll off just above at around 6k to 8k. I think this is where Justin gets his 7k number from. It didn’t seem out of line to me, just not defined how he got there.

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Another observation: coming at this as a beginner, I’m aware that there are more than one “A” notes on the fretboard. It might be helpful to acknowledge that there are other A notes on the fretboard that have different pitches - more on that next when we discuss Octaves.

I also realize this is an introduction, to be kept simple…but it might be frustrating to some beginners (especially those who already think music theory is icky) to read a statement and to immediately come up with a counterexample so soon.

Not sure it’s worth editing that into the vid, but having the web page and workbook stating that could be nice.

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Thanks for the proof-reading / checking. I have edited the text on the lesson page. I can’t edit the video for obvious reasons. I have added a note that there is an error in the video.

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Thank you Richard. I’d downloaded the new WB when reviewing the new lessons. I’ll check my journey status but unlike to do the exam again ! :rofl:

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Judi … I know it is not editing the video. Perhaps this diagram illustrates the information and can clarify for anyone uncertain about the repeated notes vs the octave notes.

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The workbook has not been updated, only the webpage.

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Are you sure? I haven’t checked, but seeing this earlier post from Richard, it should have been updated:

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I mean, not with the new text that Richard wrote on the lesson page.

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Wow, that’s a great diagram Richard. It seems to me that could help folks coming to music theory for the first time, and perhaps those who know some theory but not from the point of view of guitar.

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