Understanding Music Ties & Strumming Patterns

Learn about musical ties and start transcribing rhythm!


View the full lesson at Understanding Music Ties & Strumming Patterns | JustinGuitar

This is my 3rd time replaying this video, but I still couldn’t understand. In the previous lesson, I am able to tell the patterns by ear with 100 per cent accuracy. And I have understood what tie notes are, but still, those eight notes with flags are very confusing! I AM SO MUCH CONFUSED, PLEASE HELP!

Great lesson, thanks Justin. For people who are struggling I recommend watching the video more than once and if you still don’t quite understand try doing the practices from the file come back to the lesson and you’ll eventually get it

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Where is this guitar pro thing to tap along with

Hi @Navytheguitarmaster
Welcome to the community. The resources (when they are available for a lesson) are always found by clicking a tab under the video pane:
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You should then see these two files:
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Cheers :blush:
| Richard_close2u | JustinGuitar Official Guide & Moderator

Welcome to the community @Manolito0 It’s great that you catch on with perseverance and repeat viewings. Others may need a little extra guidance - and the encouragement that you offer too.
Cheers :blush:
| Richard_close2u | JustinGuitar Official Guide & Moderator

Hi @ishukushwaha and welcome to the community.

See if this breakdown helps.

From the downloadable pdf file, Example A part 1 we see:

The second bar is an exact match (in terms of what your strumming hand would do and what your ear would be listening to). Perhaps it helps to have them not side-by-side by one above the other with the count of 1, 2, 3, 4 spaced between them.

image

1_____2_____3_____4

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The first bar (top) has a half note lasting for the count of 1 and 2 both.
Then it has two quarter notes lasting for 3 and then 4 respectively.
In total the strumming is only three down strums - once on the count of 1, then again on the counts of 3 and 4.

The second bar (bottom) has two quarter notes joined together with a curved line (tied) which means together they last for the count of 1 and then 2 also.
Then it has a quarter note lasting for the count of 3.
Then it has two eighth notes (recognisable by the fact they are connected with the straight line between them called a flag) that are also connected by a curved line (tied). Because these are two eighths but are tied their combined duration is that of one quarter so these two last for the count of 4.
In total, the strumming is only three down strums - once on the count of 1, then again on the counts of 3 and 4.

The two bars have identical effect on the actions of player and experience of the listener.
Their depiction on paper has a different appearance so require a slightly careful interpretation in order to play them correctly.

Does that help to get you started on the right path with the many other examples? This is the first and simplest so take your time and follow the written bars along with the video.

Cheers :blush:
| Richard_close2u | JustinGuitar Official Guide & Moderator

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Thank you! One more question though… how do I open it? do I need guitar pro for it to work?

Yes you need Guitar Pro to open GP files. You can open the pdf though without.
Cheers :blush:
| Richard_close2u | JustinGuitar Official Guide & Moderator

Hi guys - quick query - are the examples at 18.47 and 19.34 not the same or am i missing something ? j

I have been unable to open any of the Guitar Pro files in Version 6. I even tried renaming the file with a .gpx extension. Any suggestions?

Hello @br4flair I think the files will have been created in GP7 and so may not be available to open in previous versions. Best contact GP themselves.
Cheers :blush:
| Richard_close2u | JustinGuitar Official Guide & Moderator

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Thank you @Richard_close2u - time for me to finally update to Version 7 :grinning:

Hello everybody! Nice to meet you all!! Hope my first post isn’t too random. I was struggling a bit last evening with ties and threw in the towel for the night. Today I decided to give it another go. First strumming pattern that popped into my head as the kids were watching family guy reruns was ”Have you ever put butter on a pop tart”. I thought what the hell, how hard can this be? I could play it instantly but when I attempt to count I get tied up like a pretzel. I can’t tell if there is a tie or if it’s in 6/8 :man_shrugging:t3:

Anyway here is what I came up with.

I’m not concerned with the song as much as using it as a learning tool. Hopefully I correctly attached link below.

Have you ever put butter on a pop tart

Thanks to all you hard working musicians.

*NOTE: I just realized there should be a quarter note on beat 3 of the second bar.

@Kuzflies Hi and welcome to the community. Good vibes and kudos to you for seeing an opportunity, any opportunity, to try your hand at applying the skills and writing rhythm out for yourself.
I’m not going to dissect this for you just yet … just give you a small hint where you express self-doubt. I don’t know Family Guy so don’t know the characters (or the song). The guy on the left. Watch his left foot. He is tapping on the beat. And the animators’ sync is good. Steady 1, 2, 3, 4.
Cheers :blush:
| Richard_close2u | JustinGuitar Official Guide & Moderator

Thanks for the reply!! This site is awesome! So…If I’m restricted to 4/4 I think they must be playing 16th notes at 100 ish bpm?

• • • • • • • • • • • •
1 e + a 2 e + a 3 e + a 4 e + a

I think the formatting messes up my dots but essentially 1 + a 2 + a 3 + a 4 + a | 1

‘Vapour Trail’ by Ride is a good song to use as practice for working out a strumming pattern…

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